Rescue Squad - FAQ's

How does someone become a member of the Rescue Squad?

Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and a registered voter of Lake County.  Rigorous background investigations accompany all accepted applications.  Upon successful completion of the background investigation, applicants are then able to participate in selected Squad operations in a non-member status.  After approximately six months as an active applicant, the candidate is brought before a vote of the membership.  If accepted by a two-thirds majority vote, the applicant becomes a voting member of the unit.

New members serve a one-year probabtionary period, during which time they are expected to complete an orientation on Squad practices and equipment, as well as obtain a medical certification to at least First Responder level.

What are the benefits/compensation for Rescue Squad members?

Rescue Squad members receive absolutely NO compensation for the hours they volunteer.

Squad members are issued uniforms, a pager, a portable radio, and a limited complement of field gear.  Approved expenses are reimbursed to the member.  Members are expected to attend meetings, respond to calls, train and practice to keep skills sharp, and perform required maintenance on buildings and equipment.

Members are expected to maintain a fully stocked trauma kit in their personal vehicle and should be prepared to "dress and go" in virtually any type of wilderness operation in any weather.

Rescue Squad membership requires a delicate balance between the demands of family, job, and Squad - a burden that should not be taken lightly when one considers applying for membership.

Where are the Rescue Squad Offices located?
 
How does the Rescue Squad receive its funding to operate?

The Rescue Squad depends on the generous support of Lake County citizens in order to carry out its difficult and challenging mission.

Another source of Rescue Squad revenues is the Minnesota Boat and Water Safety Fund, a budget allocated to each of Minnesota's 87 counties according to the amount of Boat and Water Safety activities the county engages in.  The only way for the Rescue Squad to earn this money is by its members volunteering their time on water activities.  The Squad is restricted in how it can spend these funds; thus, we again depend heavily on the support of public donations.